Header Logo
Facebook
Twitter
Email
High School
6380 Mill Road | Broadview Hts, OH 44147

☎ 440-740-4700    
MenuBBHCSD Mobile
Home

Health and Wellness Introduction

At Brecksville-Broadview Heights High School our focus is and always has been on increasing our students' academic achievement while preparing them for college and career success.  Research has demonstrated that the health and wellness of students is strongly linked to their ability to perform in the classroom.  This section of our website is designed to share information and resources with our students and their families that will help them investigate and make better decisions related to their health and wellness.  The health and wellness of our students encompasses a broad range of areas physically and mentally.  This collection of information and resources is designed to: 

  • be helpful
  • start conversations between our students and their families
  • lead to better lifestyle choices
  • help in identification of when professional help is needed
  • raise awareness among our valued community members

We welcome the suggestions and recommendations of new research and resources to potentially include in the future.  Students and their families are encouraged to also research these topics as the science related to information in this collection of resources is evolving constantly.

Statement from Experts on the Upcoming Release of 13 Reasons Why, Season 2 from Suicide Voices of Education and shared on the Stanford Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences website.

Nutrition

Eating right is an essential component of living a healthy lifestyle.  Food and drink fuel our bodies for the physical and mental activities of the day.  Your diet can help you:

  • maintain a healthy weight
  • reduce risks of chronic diseases
  • promote your overall health and wellness. 

Nutrition plays a vital role in providing you the energy for all of a day's activities and can increase your ability to perform physically and mentally.  Eating healthy has also been linked to higher test scores and increased academic achievement.  Click here to access resources and information about nutrition.  

Sleep

Sleep is one of the most important essential things we do to stay healthy.  Teenagers need at least 8 hours and on average 9.25 hours a night of uninterrupted sleep for the body to be rejuvenated for the next day.  This is often a difficult obstacle for high school students due to extra-curricular activity commitments, school work, a job, and social activities.  If sleep is interrupted or cut short the body does not have time to repair muscles, release hormones related to appetite and growth, and consolidate memories.  Click here for more specific information about sleep and its importance.

Physical Activity

Exercise and physical activity are not just ways to "get in shape" they are also critical to maintaining a happy and healthy life.  The obvious and well known benefits include: 

  • increasing strength in your muscles
  • reducing fat
  • improving the condition of your heart and lungs
  • promoting strong bone, muscle, and joint development. 
  • improve your quality of sleep
  • relieve stress
  • increase your energy and self esteem
  • reduce the potential for depression. 

Research has also indicated that physical activity and exercise stimulates the brain, which can increase academic achievement and improve performance on tests.  Click here for more information on the positive impact exercise and physical activity can have on your health and wellness.

Mental Health

Mental Health is not just the absence of a disease or mental health disorder, it is much more.  As youth grow and mature, they achieve mental and emotional milestones.  This process can be described as achieving developmental competence, or the ability to navigate social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral tasks at different developmental stages.  A part of achieving developmental competence is adhering to cultural and social norms as well as developing a positive sense of identity, efficacy, and well-being. (youth.gov and Eccles & Gootman, 2009)  

Mental Health is at the very least equally important as physical health if not more important for children as it relates to their wellness in being prepared to learn at school.  Unfortunately, due to a lack of understanding, stigma, and limited resources mental health needs often go untreated.  It is essential that we work as a community to better understand the mental health and wellness needs of our students while promoting their well-being through the environment, education, and supports we provide them.  This entails being aware of and identifying risk factors, and ensuring that protective factors are in place to support our children.  Click here for more information and resources related to Mental Health.

If you have concerns about the mental health or well-being of yourself, a friend, or loved one, especially as it relates to self-harm or suicide, please contact local authorities immediately or dial 911.

Brecksville Police Department: 440.526.8900

Broadview Heights Police Department:  440.526.5400

National Suicide Hotline: 1.800.273.8255 (24 hours a day)

Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 from anywhere in the US (24 hours a day)

GRIT

Researcher and professor Angela Duckworth has defined Grit as perseverance and passion for goals.  Her work has identified Grit as the essential variable to success, follow through, and attainment of goals.  Her studies indicate that it can be a better predictor of success than IQ and talent in a wide range of careers, education, and even personal areas of life.  Click here to access more information and resources about Grit.

Dimensions of Wellness

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) identifies eight dimensions of wellness to focus on to "optimize" your health.  The eight dimensions are: 

  • emotional
  • spiritual
  • intellectual
  • physical
  • environmental
  • financial
  • occupational
  • social 

Wellness can be compromised by lack of support, trauma, unhelpful thinking styles, chronic illness/disability, and substance use.  Click here to learn more about the eight dimensions.  

Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Vaping

Experimentation with alcohol and drugs during adolescence is common. Unfortunately, teenagers often don't see the link between their actions today and the consequences tomorrow. They also have a tendency to feel indestructible and immune to the problems that others experience.

Using alcohol and tobacco at a young age has negative health effects. Some teens will experiment and stop, or continue to use occasionally without significant problems. Others will develop a dependency, moving on to more dangerous drugs and causing significant harm to themselves and possibly others. It is difficult to know which teens will experiment and stop and which will develop serious problems. Teenagers at risk for developing serious alcohol and drug problems include those:

  • with a family history of substance use disorders
  • who are depressed
  • who have low self-esteem, and
  • who feel like they don't fit in or are out of the mainstream

Teenagers abuse a variety of drugs, both legal and illegal. Legally available drugs include alcohol, prescribed medications, inhalants (fumes from glues, aerosols, and solvents) and over-the-counter cough, cold, sleep, and diet medications. The most commonly used illegal drugs are marijuana (pot), stimulants (cocaine, crack, and speed), LSD, PCP, opiates or opioid pain killers, heroin, and designer drugs (Ecstasy). The use of illegal drugs is increasing, especially among young teens. The average age of first marijuana use is 14, and alcohol use can start before age 12. The use of marijuana and alcohol in high school has become common.

Often teenagers use other family members' or friends' medications to get high. Additionally, some adolescents misuse their friends' stimulant medications like Ritalin and Adderall.

Drug use is associated with a variety of negative consequences, including increased risk of serious drug use later in life, school failure, and poor judgment which may put teens at risk for accidents, violence, unplanned and unsafe sex, and suicide.

Parents can help prevent their children from using drugs by talking to them about drug use, open communication, role modeling, responsible behavior, and recognizing if problems are developing. Prescription pain killers like opioids should be kept secure and closely monitored. Any prescription medications that are no longer being used should not remain in the home.

Warning signs of teenage alcohol and drug use may include:

Physical: Fatigue, repeated health complaints, red and glazed eyes, and a lasting cough.

Emotional: Personality change, sudden mood changes, irritability, irresponsible behavior, low self-esteem, poor judgment, depression, and a general lack of interest.

Family: Starting arguments, breaking rules, or withdrawing from the family.

School: Decreased interest, negative attitude, drop in grades, many absences, truancy, and discipline problems.

Social problems: New friends who are less interested in standard home and school activities, problems with the law, and changes to less conventional styles in dress and music.

Some of the warning signs listed above can also be signs of other problems. Parents may recognize signs of trouble and possible use of alcohol and other drugs with their teenager. If you have concerns you may want to consult a physician to rule out physical causes of the warning signs. This should often be followed or accompanied by a comprehensive evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist or mental health professional.

From the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry website March 2018 

Click here to access more information about Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Vaping. 

Nutrition

Eating right is an essential component of living a healthy lifestyle.  Food and drink fuel our bodies for the physical and mental activities of the day.  Your diet can help you:
  • maintain a healthy weight
  • reduce risks of chronic diseases
  • promote your overall health and wellness. 

Nutrition plays a vital role in providing you the energy for all of a day's activities and can increase your ability to perform physically and mentally.  Eating healthy has also been linked to higher test scores and increased academic achievement.  Click here to access resources and information about nutrition.  

Sleep

Sleep is one of the most important essential things we do to stay healthy.  Teenagers need at least 8 hours and on average 9.25 hours a night of uninterrupted sleep for the body to be rejuvenated for the next day.  This is often a difficult obstacle for high school students due to extra-curricular activity commitments, school work, a job, and social activities.  If sleep is interrupted or cut short the body does not have time to repair muscles, release hormones related to appetite and growth, and consolidate memories.  Click here for more specific information about sleep and its importance.

Physical Activity

Excercise and physical activity are not just ways to "get in shape" they are also critical to maintaining a happy and healthy life.  The obvious and well known benefits include: 
  • increasing strength in your muscles
  • reducing fat
  • improving the condition of your heart and lungs
  • promoting strong bone, muscle, and joint development. 
  • improve your quality of sleep
  • relieve stress
  • increase your energy and self esteem
  • reduce the potential for depression. 

Research has also indicated that physical activity and excercise stimulates the brain, which can increase academic achievement and improve performance on tests.  Click here for more information on the positive impact excercise and physical activity can have on your health and wellness.

Mental Health

Mental Health is not just the absence of a disease or mental health disorder, it is much more.  As youth grow and mature, they achieve mental and emotional milestones.  This process can be described as achieving developmental competence, or the ability to navigate social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral tasks at different developmental stages.  A part of achieving developmental competence is adhering to cultural and social norms as well as developing a positive sense of identity, efficacy, and well-being. (youth.gov and Eccles & Gootman, 2009)  
 
Mental Health is at the very least equally important as physical health if not more important for children as it relates to their wellness in being prepared to learn at school.  Unfortunately, due to a lack of understanding, stigma, and limited resources mental health needs often go untreated.  It is essential that we work as a community to better understand the mental health and wellness needs of our students while promoting their well being through the environment, education, and supports we provide them.  This entails being aware of and identifying risk factors, and ensuring that protective factors are in place to support our children.  Click here for more information and resources related to Mental Health.
 
If you have concerns about the mental health or well-being of yourself, a friend, or loved one, especially as it relates to self harm or suicide, please contact local authorities immediately or dial 911.
 
Brecksville Police Department: 440.526.8900
Broadview Heights Police Department:  440.526.5400
National Suicide Hotline: 1.800.273.8255 (24 hours a day)
Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 from anywhere in the US (24 hours a day) 

GRIT

Researcher and professor Angela Duckworth has defined Grit as perseverance and passion for goals.  Her work has identified Grit as the essential variable to success, follow through, and attainment of goals.  Her studies indicate that it can be a better predictor of success than IQ and talent in a wide range of careers, education, and even personal areas of life.  Click here to access more information and resources about Grit.

Dimensions of Wellness

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) identifies eight dimensions of wellness to focus on to "optimize" your health.  The eight dimensions are: 
  • emotional
  • spiritual
  • intellectual
  • physical
  • environmental
  • financial
  • occupational
  • social 

Wellness can be compromised by lack of support, trauma, unhelpful thinking styles, chronic illness/disability, and substance use.  Click here to learn more about the eight dimensions.  

Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Vaping

Experimentation with alcohol and drugs during adolescence is common. Unfortunately, teenagers often don't see the link between their actions today and the consequences tomorrow. They also have a tendency to feel indestructible and immune to the problems that others experience.

Using alcohol and tobacco at a young age has negative health effects. Some teens will experiment and stop, or continue to use occasionally without significant problems. Others will develop a dependency, moving on to more dangerous drugs and causing significant harm to themselves and possibly others. It is difficult to know which teens will experiment and stop and which will develop serious problems. Teenagers at risk for developing serious alcohol and drug problems include those:

  • with a family history of substance use disorders
  • who are depressed
  • who have low self-esteem, and
  • who feel like they don't fit in or are out of the mainstream

Teenagers abuse a variety of drugs, both legal and illegal. Legally available drugs include alcohol, prescribed medications, inhalants (fumes from glues, aerosols, and solvents) and over-the-counter cough, cold, sleep, and diet medications. The most commonly used illegal drugs are marijuana (pot), stimulants (cocaine, crack, and speed), LSD, PCP, opiates or opioid pain killers, heroin, and designer drugs (Ecstasy). The use of illegal drugs is increasing, especially among young teens. The average age of first marijuana use is 14, and alcohol use can start before age 12. The use of marijuana and alcohol in high school has become common.

Often teenagers use other family members' or friends' medications to get high. Additionally, some adolescents misuse their friends' stimulant medications like Ritalin and Adderall.

Drug use is associated with a variety of negative consequences, including increased risk of serious drug use later in life, school failure, and poor judgment which may put teens at risk for accidents, violence, unplanned and unsafe sex, and suicide.

Parents can help prevent their children from using drugs by talking to them about drug use, open communication, role modeling, responsible behavior, and recognizing if problems are developing. Prescription pain killers like opioids should be kept secure and closely monitored. Any prescription medications that are no longer being used should not remain in the home.

Warning signs of teenage alcohol and drug use may include:

Physical: Fatigue, repeated health complaints, red and glazed eyes, and a lasting cough.

Emotional: Personality change, sudden mood changes, irritability, irresponsible behavior, low self-esteem, poor judgment, depression, and a general lack of interest.

Family: Starting arguments, breaking rules, or withdrawing from the family.

School: Decreased interest, negative attitude, drop in grades, many absences, truancy, and discipline problems.

Social problems: New friends who are less interested in standard home and school activities, problems with the law, and changes to less conventional styles in dress and music.

Some of the warning signs listed above can also be signs of other problems. Parents may recognize signs of trouble and possible use of alcohol and other drugs with their teenager. If you have concerns you may want to consult a physician to rule out physical causes of the warning signs. This should often be followed or accompanied by a comprehensive evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist or mental health professional.

From the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry website March 2018 

Click here to access more information about Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Vaping. 

Brecksville – Broadview Heights City School District
6638 Mill Road  |  Brecksville, Ohio 44141  |  440-740-4000
Footer Slogan
Footer facebook
Footer twitter
© Copyright 2019. All Rights Reserved. CMS Created by eSchoolView
facebook twitter
Brecksville - Broadview Heights City School District 6638 Mill Road | Brecksville, OH 44141 ☎ 440-740-4000